Tens of billions of dollars later…

Advertisements

If you somehow still have not seen Endgame, how did you get this far, first of all. Second, Spoiler(s) alert for the biggest movie of all time below.

Technically, the events of 2019’s Captain Marvel took place before the Avengers existed…or there never would have been a pager. Indeed, the Flerken – while the Space Stone-containing Tesseract was within him – gave Nick Fury his distinctive eye patch sometime after a Blockbuster was destroyed (but well before it, and the Radio Shack down the strip mall) went out of business.

(Even more technically, Captain America was in fact the "first Avenger;" additionally, one can't be sure Doctor Strange didn't go to the far past during one of his 14,000,605 practice runs on Titan making him and/or his compatriots the "first Avenger" in the timeline accepted as canon.)

When the below was released, GNR was still 6 months away from their latest album, Kings of Leon hadn’t even been nominated for a Grammy yet, and Sony owned Spiderman. This trend-setting end credit scene (did anyone Actually see it in the theater when it first aired?!) gave us the first hint the MCU was going to exist; it also gave audiences everywhere a great reason to Respect the Cast and Crew chatter nervously in their seats wondering what universe-altering bomb was going to drop next for literally the next decade.

MCUnderstood

The word ‘fantasy’ is one that conjures up mythical beasts of all ages. More importantly, its the heroes that defeat them that are ultimately the ones to etch their opponents names, along with their own, into history. In the late 2000’s, Marvel Studios began planning 20+ years worth of superhero films, starting with Iron Man. A couple billion dollars in profits and 10 films later, the single Marvel Cinematic Universe (as compared to the DCU Multiverse) is an incredible testament to creativity adapted to the 21st century moviegoer. With input from countless creativists, these movies feature comic book heroes that were originally created in the late 1940s, and are now enjoying the distinction of receiving epic motion pictures either as standalone, easter-egg heavy compositions, or as mystical interpretations based upon stories that originated thousands of years ago. In doing so, the 45+ movies blur the line between how an ancient story gets updated, and how new methods of creativity and technology allow for a big-picsure reboot of aforementioned stories that create and inspire those walking among us to ask ‘what if.’